Morse Code

CW Happenings

Here are a few ideas to help those who want to log some on-air CW time.  There are a few local nets around that are frequented by those keen on learning or enhancing their CW skills. 

CW Ops Give Back (Mondays 1000Z)

CW Ops (CWops – Celebrating the unique art form of Morse Code) is an international club dedicated to supporting amateur operators who enjoy CW.  As well as offering courses through CW Academy, Chris VK3QB (EMDRC Member) and Graeme VK5GG run local CW Ops ‘Give Back’ sessions.

You’ll find either Chris or Graeme (or both) calling ‘cq cq gb gb de vk1cwo vk1cwo k’ every Monday evening at 10:00Z. These sessions are better suited to operators who have mastered the basics and are looking to further improve an deepen their CW conversational skill.

Come and join in; be it a short or long QSO, you’ll be welcome.  SWL are welcome too.  Drop us an email to let us know you’ll be there and we’ll say 

Read more about CW Ops Give Back sessions here Giving Back (On-Air Practice) – CWops. For local information visit the qrz.com page for VK1CWO.

Slow CW (Tuesdays 0900Z)

The ‘Slow CW’ group meet every Tuesday from 0900 – 1200Z on 7040kHz and then 3540 kHz until 2359 UTC.  As the group’s name suggests, this session is directed at those still coming up to speed, or those who prefer the slower pace. 

For more info contact Mark VK2ki/VK6QI via qrz.com

The VKCW Net (Wednesday 0700Z)

Those interested in CW might like join in the fun on the VKCW net where the usual net control is EMDRC member Manny VK3DRQ.   The net meets every Wednesday at 0603Z/ UTC (1700hrs summer/1600hrs winter AEST) on 14049 kHz

More information can be found at http://vkcw.wikidot.com/cwnets or contact the net manager Roy VK6RR (email radioroy_99@yahoo.com or see QRZ.com.

Although fast, if you come up, they will slow down to match your speed and help build your skill.

FDU QSO Party (Fridays 1100Z) 

FISTS Down Under (FDU) host a QSO Party every Friday evening for one hour.  An operator’s ‘fist’ is unique; a little bit like hand writing.  Many CW operators can identify another operator by listening to their ‘fist’. You can learn more about FDU by visiting  http://www.fdu.org.au 

Most Friday evenings from about 1100 UTC you’ll find members enjoying casual QSOs on 7028 and 3528 kHz.

These groups use different social media platforms to liaise and schedule activities. All are welcome. For those just venturing into CW, the convention is that faster Ops will slow to suit your abilities. The groups are very encouraging and support new operators generously. Like learning to ride a bike, it can be overwhelming at the start, but a little perseverance will reward you.

For more info on learning CW, visit http://www.cwops.org or http://www.fdu.org.au